I found the Adverse Childhood Experience Study most interesting

The information from Dr. Nadine Burke on Adverse Childhood Experience Study was most interesting and valuable for that matter. Understanding the science behind the development or lack thereof, for some students helped to build tolerance and empathy as a pedagogue, which can be easily forgotten as the year progresses and frustration begins to fester with “uncooperative” students. Learning how these experiences, however, minor or not, can truly impact the executive function of many students that can easily be labeled with ADD or ADHD. Many times the level of frustration because a student refuses to complete assignments, work collaboratively, or just not distract others brings about a reaction that will not make the situation better. Another valuable idea to walk away with, are the logical approaches to help develop dual citizenship. These ideas are engaging, thought provoking, and simple enough to avoid frustration that often triggers negative classroom behavior. The engagement is imperative to help maintain a functioning classroom. Using this information helped to recognize the importance in developing executive functioning skills and that it is imperative for students to repeatedly put these skills into practice. They must be exposed to decision making in a guided setting and this is where the use of the Eight Essential Questions would be most useful in developing dual citizenship. Students first need to learn about mean vs. nice behavior in the dirt world to acknowledge that these behaviors also exist in the cyber-world. Recognizing that ACEs may have an effect on the pace to which students display executive functioning skills will be the challenge when lesson planning. Still, it is important for students to develop an understanding that there are consequences to their behaviors that will have a great impact on their futures. The regular open discussions will hopefully give students the ability to develop skills needed to become functioning 21st century dual citizens.

Whether you are a school administrator, teacher, parent, mentor or corporation, we can design a program to suit your needs. Let’s make the connection!

1 + 1 =

Lunch Bunch success

The students you meet with in the “lunch bunch” are so excited to go to the program each week.

Persistence keeps the program going

Randy, a boy at School 2 has been struggling (basically failing most subjects) in school for several years. When I met him his teachers, counselors, parents and administration were frustrated and simply did not know how to support and motivate him academically. He was always forgetting things, not turning in work, failing tests and disorganized. Last year in lunch bunch we worked on self-advocacy. This email is a testament to his advocating for himself…he continuously went to the counselor’s office asking to bring back Gen Text because our work with him supports him academically, socially and emotionally! How awesome is this?????

Video: Professional Learning/Training

See how a professional session goes.

Relationships and connections are so important!

These reminders about connections/relationships are so important. It can feel difficult to fit it all in, but without relationships and connection, the rest of the work is SO MUCH HARDER!

I Find Myself Truly Engaged

After taking this course, I find myself truly engaged in the two lessons describing the eight essential questions and “Mean V. Nice.”

Cultivating a strong bond can help students in many ways

It is something tangible that I can work on each and every day of the school year, without needing to be within the context of bullying or harassment.